With working smoke alarms, injuries and fatalities can be prevented

Thanks to a generous gift from the Richard and Jane Manoogian Foundation, fire detectors will become available for families to prevent future injury

 

April 3, 2017 – Detroit, Mich.— On average, the Detroit Fire Department responds to over 30,000 fires a year, roughly 82 per day. Children under the age of 5 are at the greatest risk of death and injury due to home fires.

Thanks to a generous $100,000 grant from the Richard and Jane Manoogian Foundation, the Children’s Hospital of Michigan Foundation is able to fund the Smoke Alarm Installation and Fire Safety program at the Children’s Hospital of Michigan, which focuses on preventing and reducing fire related injuries. The Smoke Alarm Installation and Fire Safety program supports at-risk families in the community with fire prevention education and safety tools. This funding will go toward the purchase of smoke alarms, carbon monoxide detectors, and educational and training materials.

“Jane and I are honored to make this grant to the Children’s Hospital of Michigan Foundation.   Programs like this play a key role in making our community a safer, healthier place for families and children,” said Richard Manoogian.

In response to the staggering number of children visiting the Emergency Room due to preventable injuries, the Children’s Hospital of Michigan Foundation supports several Injury Prevention Programs at the Children’s Hospital of Michigan.

“The Children’s Hospital of Michigan Foundation is committed to preventing injury and providing the resources to Michigan children and their families to protect themselves,” said Lawrence Burns, President and CEO of the Foundation.  “That is why we support programs such as the Smoke Alarm Installation and Fire Safety Program as one of our focus areas in pediatric injury prevention. We are extremely grateful to the Richard and Jane Manoogian Foundation for recognizing the need to place working smoke alarms and carbon monoxide detectors in homes with children, to prevent future injury or fatality.”

To learn more about how the Children’s Hospital of Michigan Foundation is making an impact in our community, please visit http://chmfoundation.org/our-impact/.

Contact: Jill Nelson  – 313-966-2022 – jill.nelson@chmfoundation.org

About Children’s Hospital of Michigan Foundation
The goal of the Children’s Hospital of Michigan Foundation is to make a significant, lasting and positive impact on children’s health through three primary areas:  Pediatric medical research, innovative community benefits and advanced medical education.  Through our efforts to improve children’s health and wellness, children have more days to play, nights to dream, and time just to be kids.  While the Foundation supports Children’s Hospital of Michigan, it is a separate public charity governed by its own independent board of directors. CHMFoundation.org, @CHMFoundation.

About the Children’s Hospital of Michigan, www.childrensdmc.org
For 130 years, the Children’s Hospital of Michigan has been dedicated to providing high quality care to children and adolescents in a caring, efficient and family-centered environment. With more than 40 pediatric medical and surgical specialty services, the hospital draws patients from nearly every Michigan County, 39 additional states, and 22 countries, annually and provides the highest level of pediatric specialty care available for children. The hospital is a national leader in cardiology and heart surgery, neurology and neurosurgery, nephrology, and orthopedics. It is ranked as one of America’s best hospitals for children and sees more children than any hospital in the state. Children’s Hospital of Michigan is one of eight hospitals operated by the Detroit Medical Center (DMC).

Smoke Alarm Installation and Fire Safety Program.  The smoke alarm program is a collaborative effort of the Children’s Hospital of Michigan Foundation, the Children’s Hospital of Michigan (CHM) Trauma Center, and local police and fire departments. Teams of trained volunteers from CHM and local community organizations coordinate to install smoke alarms and carbon monoxide detectors on the floors that do not have them. The existing smoke detectors in the home, if any, will be checked during the installation to ensure they are working properly. Batteries are changed as necessary, and smoke detectors found to be outdated or not working properly are replaced. At the time of the installation, families are encouraged to make a commitment to test the smoke alarms once a month, develop a fire escape plan, practice escape routes regularly, and maintain the fire safety equipment in the home.